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Easier to sell cells than sort social care?

By Caring Times editor GEOFF HODGSON

Without assaulting you with a homily on penal reform, I do think that spending £2.5bn on ten thousand extra prison places is more an admission of defeat than a positive strategy to reduce crime; quite the reverse in fact. As a sample of what me might see happening in social care, it’s a bit frightening. ‘Inside the box’ thinking in more ways than one.

Why this fiscal commitment to prisons by Mr Johnson just a couple of weeks after becoming PM? I sort of got the impression that he was going to give priority to social care . . . if he can bung-in £2.5bn to bang-up more evildoers (as a stopgap measure) surely some of Boris’s bounty should be coming our way, and soon.

But the spots on the leopard are beginning to show; I fear we are going to see a lot of runaway populist policy with any really difficult stuff being once again relegated to the back of the hob.

  • The CT Blog is written in a personal capacity – comments and opinions expressed are not necessarily endorsed or supported by Caring Times.

2 Replies to “Easier to sell cells than sort social care?”

  1. It’s hard to get away from the fact that prison is our sole remaining protect/punish/deter/rehabilitate recourse and thus adequate sentences makes sense and so more cells is a clear need. Early decisions on the urgent crisis in Social Care seem far more difficult to specify. Legislation has raised care standards beyond the apparent affordability of state funding. I recall, decades ago, a bank leader saying things were inevitably leading towards a two-tier system in care, yet that reality has not yet sunk-in, let alone being attended to in any practical way. I have a, no doubt controvertial, suggestion for some real early amelioration of the crisis. Many will recall the New Minimum Standards, in 2002, introduced the rule that no more than 20% of registered beds in any care home may be in shared bedrooms. One home that was a 47 bed, instantly became a 27 bed; not only were 10 beds lost but the remaining beds fees were intrinsically 33.3% more expensive than those 10.

  2. Interesting isn’t it. I read at the weekend that many of the people in our criminal justice system are there as a result of a social care failure or break down. As such why not address the horse rather than invest everything in the cart?

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