Other Upcoming Events

NAPA Benefit Dinner

24 Sep 2019

Malmaison, Birmingham

Young Dementia Annual Conference 2019

20 Nov 2019

St Giles Hotel, London

UK Dementia Congress 2019

05 Nov 2019

Doncaster Racecourse

Beyond Dementia Care - All Care Matters Conference

19 Jul 2019

University of Surrey, Guildford

Caring Times Christmas Lunch 2019

12 Dec 2019

The Dorchester Hotel, Park Lane, London

Modest constructs

By Caring Times editor GEOFF HODGSON Centuries ago, we built cathedrals. In the early twentieth century, the big teaching hospitals symbolised the secular summit of civilisation. These days it’s glass and concrete towers of corporate aggrandisement and out-of-town shopping centres – which should tell us something about ourselves. There are not many new teaching hospitals on the draftsman’s screen, and still fewer cathedrals.

But here’s a paradox: while cathedrals are becoming progressively emptier, hospitals are bursting at the seams – it’s almost as if, having lost confidence in the idea of the great beyond, we have become ever more determined to prolong our mortal existences – a bird in the hand, so to speak.

Yet hospitals, we know, are dangerous places – there are thousands of potential mistakes waiting to be made; the chances of picking up a nasty infection are much higher than elsewhere and, because of staff shortages, the overall quality of care often leaves much to be desired. Frail, elderly people are most at risk from these citadels of sickness.

So it’s a very good thing that advances in medical and surgical treatment mean that the average length of stay in a hospital has steadily reduced – it is now just six days. This could come down even more if we could only stop seeing hospitals as being the flagships of the healthcare system – they are more the hulks. This is happening, with health services being disseminated via health campuses and the like, but too slowly, and there seems to be a perverse trend in closing small, community hospitals.

At least we are building care homes – modest constructs compared to cathedrals, hospitals, shopping centres and bombastic bastions of corporate finance, but places where elderly people can live out their lives in comfort and dignity. Care homes are undoubtedly a social good and, with a little imagination and willingness to engage on the part of healthcare services, could become effective providers of sub-acute care – a safer haven than a hospital ward.

  • The CT Blog is written in a personal capacity – comments and opinions expressed are not necessarily endorsed or supported by Caring Times.

One Reply to “Modest constructs”

  1. Interesting observations as always Geoff but when it comes to your comment “at least we’re building care homes”, we are, but as with everything these days, only for those who can afford them. If you’ve not been fortunate enough to have put plenty aside for your old age then fingers crossed that the old stock is still standing when you need it because the government all but abandoned any pretence of finding the money to meet this need.

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